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Of ‘Gods and Monsters’: Shelley’s Frankenstein Two Hundred Years On @ Union University
Apr 19 – Apr 21 all-day

Keynote Speaker: Dr. Christina Bieber Lake, Clyde S. Kilby Professor of English, Wheaton College, and author of Prophets of the Posthuman: American Literature, Biotechnology and the Ethics of Personhood (Univ. of Notre Dame Press, 2013). Dr. Bieber Lake is also the author of the book The Incarnational Art of Flannery O’Connor and many articles which have appeared in Books & Culture and elsewhere.

The primary theme of the convention will be a celebration of the bicentennial of the publication of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. Union University itself envisions a campus-wide, interdisciplinary commemoration for the calendar year, though the focus for this conference will be, as always, on the intersection of theology and fiction. Within the Frankenstein motif, possible topics and areas of interest include:

  • Mary Shelley’s legacy in contemporary science fiction
  • Creation: Human, subhuman and posthuman
  • Narrative frames and the voice of the marginalized
  • Science, technology, and the limitations of knowledge
  • Maternity and paternity
  • Idealized vs. “monstrous” femininity
  • “Singularity” in terms of AI vs. human intelligence
  • Revisions of Frankenstein in movies/pop culture


CBHD’s 25th Annual Summer Conference: Bioethics and Being Human @ Trinity International University
Jun 21 – Jun 23 all-day

The Center for Bioethics & Human Dignity’s 25th Annual Conference: Bioethics & Being Human

Join us for our 25th annual summer conference, as we explore anew our individual and common humanity in light of the ever-evolving developments in medicine, science, and technology. Plenary speakers will address being and remaining human in an age of science and technology, genetics, neuroscience & the BRAIN Initiative; bioethics in literature and pop culture; human rights & dignity; and theological examinations of contentment, human flourishing, particularity, and embodiment as they relate to bioethics.

Engage more personally in workshops and parallel sessions on a wide spectrum of perennial and emerging issues in contemporary bioethics relevant to professional practice, public policy, scholarship, the classroom, and making moral decisions in everyday life.

Plenary speakers include Christina Bieber Lake, PhD; Dennis Hollinger, PhD; C. Christopher Hook, MD; Warren Kinghorn, MD, ThD; Paul Scherz, PhD, PhD; Read Mercer Schuchardt, PhD; Michael Sleasman, PhD; Pia de Solenni, SThD; Morse Tan, JD; and Stephen Williams, PhD.

Conference workshops are sponsored by leading organizations such as Alliance Defending Freedom, American Association of Prolife OB|GYNS, Americans United for Life, Charlotte Lozier Institute, and Joni & Friends. These workshops include sessions on rights of conscience, disability, pain management & addiction, among others.

Conference rates are reduced in honor of CBHD’s 25th anniversary. Continuing Medical Education credit is pending and expected to be available.

The Center for Bioethics & Human Dignity is a Christian bioethics research center at Trinity International University committed to anticipating, interpreting, and engaging the pressing bioethical issues of our day from a Judeo-Christian Hippocratic perspective.

Arete Medical Ethics Summer Seminar @ Duke University, Durham, NC
Jun 25 – Jun 29 all-day

Arete Medical Ethics Summer Seminar
June 25-June 29, 2018 | Duke University, Durham, NC
A seminar for students of medicine and nursing

This seminar invites students to examine the central ethical questions that arise in the everyday practice of medicine and to interpret those questions through a moral framework drawing from both natural law and medicine’s traditional orientation toward the patient’s health. This framework will be contrasted with principlism and consequentialism as participants consider what sort of practice medicine is, whether it has a rational end or goal, and how medicine contributes to human flourishing.

The seminar will consider common clinical ethical cases to examine perennial ethical concerns that arise in the practice of medicine, including: the nature of the clinician-patient relationship; the limits of medicine, the meaning of autonomy, the place of conscience in the physician’s work, the difference between an intended effect and a side effect, proportionality, human dignity, sexuality and reproduction, the beginning of life, disability, end-of-life care, and death. The purpose of the seminar is to equip participants with intellectual tools that can help physicians discern how to practice medicine well in the face of medicine’s clinical challenges and moral complexities.

Farr Curlin, MD, Duke University
Christopher Tollefsen, PhD, University of South Carolina

This seminar is open to entering and current medical students, as well as nursing students

 Registration Fee and Facilities
A $200 non-refundable registration fee will be required of all accepted students. All other expenses, including room and board for the duration of the seminar, are covered by the Arete Initiative.

 Application Requirements and Instructions:
All applicants must submit the following forms and documents via e-mail to [email protected].

-Curriculum vitae or resume, including your nationality.
-Cover letter discussing the reasons for your interest in the seminar, an overview of any relevant experience in the seminar’s topic. Please explain how you found out about the seminar.

 Applications will be considered on a rolling basis until April 26th, 2018.


32nd European Conference on Philosophy of Medicine and Health Care: The Human Condition in between Medicine, Arts and the Humanities @ University of Lisbon (Portugal)
Aug 22 – Aug 25 all-day

This conference will be organised by the European Society for Philosophy of Medicine and Healthcare and the Faculty of Medicine, University of Lisbon. The relationships between medicine, arts and the humanities are multifaceted owing to the intricate ways in which they reflect and are conditioned by basic traits of the human condition. Art, humanities and medicine have pivotal roles in shaping our cultural and individual self-understanding. Medicine, whilst being regarded as a dominantly scientific endeavour, is also referred to as the art of healing. At least some medical illustrations and 3D models can arguably be seen as art. In addition, cosmetic dentistry and surgery are informed by aesthetic criteria. Vice versa, art can be seen as a form of therapy. The humanities, finally, play an increasingly important role in both medical education and clinical practice. In a time of kaleidoscopic change in medical research, clinical practice and healthcare systems, the focus of this conference is on medicine and its relations with the arts and the humanities. Abstracts addressing any of the issues mentioned in the headings below from a philosophical and/or ethical perspective will be favoured, although work on other topics can also be submitted.


Human Condition

  • Birth
  • Childhood & adolescence
  • Love, sex & reproduction
  • Illness/disease
  • Aging
  • Mortality and death


Arts and medicine

  • Literature and medicine
  • Music, dance, theatre, visual arts and literature and their role in supporting health and wellbeing
  • Popular culture



  • Narrative medicine
  • Life cycle and human condition: Between biology and biography
  • Health narratives and the fabrication of truth
  • Shaping identity and reconfiguration of medicine
  • Art, science-fiction, scientific imagination


Humanities and medicine

  • Medical and health humanities
  • History
  • Film and theatre studies
  • Religious/theological studies
  • Medical anthropology


Hope between uncertainty and complexity

  • Progress and sustainability
  • Artificial intelligence in medicine /health care
  • Robotics (care, social and/or sex robots)
  • Cybersex, cyborgs, cryonics and solitude
  • Transhumanism and science fiction



  • Intellectual property and conflict management
  • Creativity, censorship, viability and sponsorship
  • Decoding, artification of medical objects
  • Access to, dispersion and disposal of medical collections
  • Indigenous peoples and vulnerable populations


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