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Dec
14
Fri
When is a Medical Treatment Worth $850,000? The Value of Luxturna @ Harvard Medical School Tosteson Medical Education Center, Room 227
Dec 14 @ 12:30 pm – 2:00 pm

Luxturna, a gene therapy treatment for a rare form of inherited blindness, was recently approved and administered for the first time to a patient at Massachusetts Eye and Ear in early 2018 at a cost of $850,000. How should patients, physicians, and the U.S. health care system approach a new generation of gene therapies that offer substantial clinical promise and are made available at such price levels?  How do we maximize “health gain” with available resources across the entire population?

Jan
18
Fri
Oxford Global Health and Bioethics International Conference 2019 – Call for Papers
Jan 18 all-day

The Wellcome Centre for Ethics and Humanities and the Ethox Centre are pleased to announce the call for papers for the third biennial Oxford Global Health and Bioethics International Conference. The conference will take place on the 1st and 2nd  of July 2019 at Keble College, University of Oxford.

Conference Focus

The ethical issues involved in the practice of Global Health initiatives and research are increasingly the subject of public and scholarly debate. These discussions have, however, tended to be dominated by a focus on particular diseases or interventions in certain locations and often with specific views of what constitutes ethics. Debate has also tended to be limited by insufficient engagement between different disciplinary approaches to this subject.

The Oxford Global Health and Bioethics International Conference takes place every two years and addresses critically important ethical issues in the conception and implementation of Global Health.  It aims to foster comprehensive multi-disciplinary debate moving beyond the parameters of disease, interventions and locations to attend to and engage with the many over-arching ethical concerns which characterise Global Health policy, practice and research.

 

Mar
1
Fri
33rd European Conference on Philosophy of Medicine and Healthcare Call for Abstracts @ University of Oslo, Norway
Mar 1 all-day

This conference will be organised by the European Society for Philosophy of Medicine and Healthcare and the Centre for Medical Ethics, the Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo. We may think we know what the terms ‘medicine’ and ‘health care’ denote and what activities should be classed as falling under each of them. Yet both medicine and health care have fuzzy borders in themselves and also overlap with other areas of human activity, e.g. in relation to the legal system or the cosmetic industry. This raises philosophical questions about how we should understand activities that are ‘at the edge of medicine’ and ethical questions about how we should evaluate such activities. Should the ethics of medicine supply the guiding principles or should activities at the edge be governed by other considerations. These and similar questions will be explored and addressed in the conference. Abstracts addressing any of the issues mentioned in the headings below from a philosophical and/or ethical perspective will be favoured, although work on other topics can also be submitted.

Borderline conditions

  • New concepts of disease, illness, or sickness
  • The co-production of concepts of human malady
  • Between esthetics and ethics
  • Identity-related conditions
  • Diagnostic creep, overdiagnosis
  • Medicalization

Clinical Ethics

  • Non-hospital/health care settings
  • Involvement of patients, relatives, and other parties
  • Relation between professionalism and ethics
  • Handling suffering without knowledge (of etiology or effective treatment)

Health systems

  • Resource allocation and ’non-medical’ conditions
  • Resource allocation and non-medical services (e.g. dentistry etc.)
  • Professional dominance vs other stakeholder dominance
  • AI for diagnosis and treatment decisions

Moral residue

  • Moral dilemmas
  • Moral failure
  • Moral disagreement
  • The problem of resolution in moral discourse
  • Tragic choices

Non-medical interventions

  • Cosmetic surgery
  • Female genital mutilation
  • Male circumcision
  • Sports medicine
  • Medical enhancement

Refugees and asylum seekers

  • DNA-testing, ethics and migration
  • Age determination in refugee children
  • Refugees’ access to health care
  • Domestic violence among asylum seekers

Expanding sciences and disruptive technologies

  • Robotics, machine learning, and intelligent systems
  • Sensors and monitoring technology
  • Gene editing, gene drives
  • DTC genetic testing
  • Genetics testing and indigenous populations
  • Citizen science

Anyone wishing to present a paper at the conference should submit an abstract in Word format (500 words maximum) before March 1, 2019. The Conference Programme Committee will select abstracts for oral presentation. Please send abstracts by e-mail to: Professor Bert Gordijn, Secretary of the ESPMH, Institute of Ethics, Dublin City University, Ireland: [email protected]

 

Mar
21
Thu
The Ethical Dimensions of Quality Measurement and Metrics – Healthcare Ethics Consortium 25th Annual Conference @ Emory Conference Center, Atlanta, GA
Mar 21 – Mar 22 all-day

Quality metrics play a major role in the provision of modern healthcare in the United States. While the goals of healthcare metrics may be focused on patient quality of care, health outcomes or economic effectiveness, metrics are increasingly utilized in accountability and quality improvement in the organization and function of healthcare institutions.

Healthcare quality improvement is also accountable for being attentive to the rights and interests of patients and being conducted in an ethically responsible manner.  Ethical considerations in quality improvement measurement include balancing patient care and outcomes improvement goals with the potential for inadvertent harm, including the impact on access to appropriate care, resource use, and provider stress and burnout.

We welcome proposals that consider the effects of metrics on the health care system and healthcare professionals, the various values upon which these metrics are founded, and their implications for healthcare ethics.  For example, proposals might address topics such as “quality measures in nursing care and ‘missed nursing care’” or “length of stay and discharge planning measures”.

In addition, there is increasing attention to the nature of accountability and measurement in the effectiveness of ethics structures and ethics consultation.   We would also welcome submissions focused on the growing emphasis on performance measures for ethics and ethics quality domains.

 

May
15
Wed
Academy for Professionalism in Health Care 7th Annual Conference: “Social Justice and Professionalism: Exploring the Challenges and Potential” @ The Jung Hotel, New Orleans, Louisiana
May 15 – May 17 all-day

The 2019 APHC conference will explore social justice education and practice in the health professions across the U.S. and internationally. While there are many definitions of social justice, it is emphasized as a key value in the 2002 Charter on Medical Professionalism, the 2017 Code of Ethics for Social Work, and included within the 2015 Code of Ethics for Nursing. What does our experience with healthcare in the 21st century tell us about successes, failures, and opportunities in embracing social justice as a professional value? What is our path moving forward?

 

Jul
1
Mon
Oxford Global Health and Bioethics International Conference 2019 @ Keble College, Oxford
Jul 1 – Jul 2 all-day

The Wellcome Centre for Ethics and Humanities and the Ethox Centre are pleased to announce the call for papers for the third biennial Oxford Global Health and Bioethics International Conference. The conference will take place on the 1st and 2nd  of July 2019 at Keble College, University of Oxford.

Conference Focus

The ethical issues involved in the practice of Global Health initiatives and research are increasingly the subject of public and scholarly debate. These discussions have, however, tended to be dominated by a focus on particular diseases or interventions in certain locations and often with specific views of what constitutes ethics. Debate has also tended to be limited by insufficient engagement between different disciplinary approaches to this subject.

The Oxford Global Health and Bioethics International Conference takes place every two years and addresses critically important ethical issues in the conception and implementation of Global Health.  It aims to foster comprehensive multi-disciplinary debate moving beyond the parameters of disease, interventions and locations to attend to and engage with the many over-arching ethical concerns which characterise Global Health policy, practice and research.

 

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