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Defining Death: Organ Transplantation and the 50-Year Legacy of the Harvard Report on Brain Death @ Joseph B. Martin Conference Center at Harvard Medical School
Apr 11 – Apr 13 all-day
In 1968, a report from a Harvard Medical School committee proposed the concept of “brain death” as a new criterion for determining human death, making possible the procurement of “living” organs from bodies diagnosed as “dead” by neurological criteria.
This conference will:
  • Explore how the Harvard report impacted the development of organ transplantation
  • Examine the scientific and philosophical foundations for determination of death by neurological or circulatory criteria
  • Discuss the controversial case of Jahi McMath from the perspectives of neurology, bioethics, and society
  • Debate alternative views about the ethics of organ procurement
  • Consider the impact of new technologies—such as gene editing and 3-D printing—that could radically alter these debates by eliminating the need for human organ donors


Deadly Medicine: Creating the Master Race @ Denver, Colorado
Apr 11 @ 11:00 am – 4:00 pm

This pre-conference session will offer participants the unique opportunity to view the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum special exhibit, Deadly Medicine: Creating the Master Race (on loan to the University of Colorado Center for Bioethics and Humanities) and participate in Medical Grand Rounds with Dr. Patricia Heberer-Rice, Senior Historian at the USHMM, specializing in medical crimes of the Holocaust, and Dr. Matthew Wynia, Director of the CU Center for Bioethics and Humanities.

After Grand Rounds, participants will walk across the beautiful CU Anschutz Medical Campus to see the Deadly Medicine exhibit. We will then break into two groups, one of which will explore several aspects of our campus that were specifically designed to facilitate interprofessional education and training, including the Center for Advancing Professional Excellence (CAPE). This group will observe an interprofessional simulation exercise at the CAPE, and join in a discussion and exploration of novel methods and tools for interprofessional education, training and practice being used and tested at CU such as our team based learning (TBL) foundational classroom course, our Open Campus program (featuring One Book One Campus) and more. The other group will attend a panel discussion at the theater-in-the-round in the Fulginiti Pavilion for Bioethics and Humanities, addressing legacies and lessons of the Holocaust for health professionals and society today.

Transportation and lunch will be provided to attendees who register by April 1, 2018.  




Age and Longevity in the 21st Century: Science, Policy, and Ethics @ ONE UN New York Millennium Hotel
Apr 13 – Apr 18 all-day

This three-day conference, sponsored by Global Bioethics Initiative and Stasis Foundation, offers a unique opportunity to call attention to the impact of new technologies on the global profile of aging and longevity. By facilitating expert discussion in a unique setting regarding broad-based perspectives on these topics, the conference promotes global thinking, scientific exploration and policy orientation at the individual, social, community and macro-societal level.


Of ‘Gods and Monsters’: Shelley’s Frankenstein Two Hundred Years On @ Union University
Apr 19 – Apr 21 all-day

Keynote Speaker: Dr. Christina Bieber Lake, Clyde S. Kilby Professor of English, Wheaton College, and author of Prophets of the Posthuman: American Literature, Biotechnology and the Ethics of Personhood (Univ. of Notre Dame Press, 2013). Dr. Bieber Lake is also the author of the book The Incarnational Art of Flannery O’Connor and many articles which have appeared in Books & Culture and elsewhere.

The primary theme of the convention will be a celebration of the bicentennial of the publication of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. Union University itself envisions a campus-wide, interdisciplinary commemoration for the calendar year, though the focus for this conference will be, as always, on the intersection of theology and fiction. Within the Frankenstein motif, possible topics and areas of interest include:

  • Mary Shelley’s legacy in contemporary science fiction
  • Creation: Human, subhuman and posthuman
  • Narrative frames and the voice of the marginalized
  • Science, technology, and the limitations of knowledge
  • Maternity and paternity
  • Idealized vs. “monstrous” femininity
  • “Singularity” in terms of AI vs. human intelligence
  • Revisions of Frankenstein in movies/pop culture


Academy for Professionalism in Health Care 2018 Annual Meeting @ Embassy Suites Baltimore Inner Harbor Hotel and The Grand Historic Venue
Apr 26 – Apr 28 all-day

The 6th annual Academy for Professionalism in Health Care Conference will be held April 26 – 28, 2018 at the Embassy Suites Inner Harbor Hotel in Baltimore, Maryland.

The theme of the conference will be: “Resilience-The intersection with professionalism”

Participants in the APHC 2018 conference will be encouraged to consider the quality of resilience, and to explore its connections to the development and demonstration of professionalism in clinicians. While there are many definitions of the term, we understand resilience to be the process of adapting well in the face of adversity, trauma, tragedy, or significant workplace stress-all common components of a healthcare environment. The values of professionalism may benefit from clinician commitment to resilience, but it is unclear how or if this attribute can be cultivated.


Brain-based and Artificial Intelligence: Socio-ethical Conversations @ Illinois Institute of Technology Downtown Campus
May 10 – May 11 all-day

Organized by the Center for the Study of Ethics in the Professions, Illinois Institute of Technology

This workshop seeks to explore the convergences and disparities in approaches to intelligence in neuroscience and computer science. It will reflect on how brain-based intelligence is similar to artificial intelligence and also how both can be combined in neurotechnology. Based on this, the workshop will explore the ethical and social implications that arise in AI and neurotechnology. We are using the term ‘brain-based’ intelligence to encompass both human and non-human animal intelligence. The workshop aims to advance an interdisciplinary discussion between scientists, practitioners, and scholars around these questions.

Invited speakers:

  • Maria Gini, Department of Computer Science and Engineering, University of Minnesota
  • Mark Coeckelbergh, Department of Philosophy, University of Vienna
  • Mikhail Lebedev, Center for Neuroengineering, Duke University

Topics for presentations may include but are not limited to:

  • Finding a Common Language: Psychology, Neuroscience, and AI
  • Understanding Intelligence: The Physiological and the Mechanical
  • Ethics of Anthropomorphic Design and Processes in AI
  • Ethical and Social Implications of AI and Neurotechnology
  • Rights in AI and Neurotechnology: Policies, Regulations and Legislation
  • Similarities and Differences of Ethics in AI and Neuroscience
  • Science-fiction: Friend or Foe? Merging of Brains and AI Technology Brain-Computer Interfaces Hybrid Intelligence

We invite presentations from the fields of neuroscience, computer science, engineering, psychology, philosophy, ethics, law, political science and social science. Please submit an abstract of up to 500 words.

Abstracts for 20-30 minute presentations are due by March 9, 2018. Please send your abstract to [email protected] also welcome your questions or proposals for additional workshop topics at [email protected].

The workshop will be held in Chicago at the Illinois Institute of Technology downtown campus.


Ethics in Healthcare 2018 @ Medical Education and Research Facility (MERF), Room 2117
May 18 @ 7:30 am – 4:15 pm

The Program in Bioethics and Humanities at the University of Iowa Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine will host its annual one day conference on May 18, 2018 in the Medical Education and Research Facility (MERF), Room 2117. This conference is designed to help healthcare professionals meet the challenges of the increasing number and range of ethical challenges in healthcare as they surface in their work as clinicians, members of ethics committees or ethics consult teams, and administrators.  For a printable brochure, click here.

Participants made the conference a genuine time of engagement, rather than just an opportunity to be informed. We all benefited from the wealth of experience, depth of insight, and range of perspectives they brought to our discussions. We look forward to Ethics in Healthcare 2018!

Intended Audience:  Physicians, Nurses, Social Workers, Chaplains, Attorneys, Physician Assistants, Trainees, Students, and Others

Provided by:  The University of Iowa Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine and the Program in Bioethics and Humanities.


Ethics and Nicotine: A Conference on Moral Dimensions of Harm Reduction within Global Tobacco Control @ Brocher Foundation
May 28 – Jun 1 all-day

Ethics and Nicotine: A conference on moral dimensions of harm reduction within global tobacco control
Brocher Foundation — Hermance, Switzerland — May 28-June 1 2018

The Brocher Foundation invites younger scholars – junior faculty, post-docs, and advanced graduate students – to apply for inclusion in the 2018 Brocher Summer Academy in Population-Level Bioethics. This year’s event is devoted to to the global debate within the field of tobacco control over the promotion of electronic cigarettes and other nicotine delivery devices as relatively safer alternative to cigarette smoking. Up to 40 promising younger scholars will be selected by competitive application to join a roster of internationally renowned scholars in tobacco control and ethics for five days of debate and discussion, held in a beautiful estate on the shores of Lake Geneva. Please consult the conference website for further information on this divisive debate.

Confirmed speakers (more to follow):
*David Abrams, public health, New York University
*Allan Brandt, history, Harvard University
*David Estlund, philosophy, Brown University
*Dorothy Hatsukami, psychiatry, University of Minnesota
*Nir Eyal, public health, Harvard University
*Michael Otsuka, philosophy, London School of Economics
*Vaughan Rees, public health, Harvard University
*Daniel Wikler, public health, Harvard University
*Derek Yach, health policy, Foundation for a Smoke-Free World

Costs: Participation is free, but a fee of CHF 750 is required to cover course documentation, five nights of accommodation, five lunches and four dinners. An optional Alpine hike follows.

To apply: More details and the application form can be found at the website of the Brocher Foundation: To apply, please fill out the application form and attach a short CV, one writing sample, and a one-paragraph description of your current research interests. The deadline for applications is March 31. For details and clarifications, please write to Monica Magalhaes, [email protected].

This event is funded exclusively by the Brocher Foundation, which accepts no funds from the tobacco industry or from any organizations supported by it. The organizers have no financial or other conflict of interests in relation to this event and have never accepted money or other valuable benefits from the tobacco industry or from any organizations supported by it.

2018 Health Law Professors Conference @ Case Western Reserve University School of Law, Cleveland, OH
Jun 7 – Jun 9 all-day

This conference is intended for professionals who teach law or bioethics in schools of law, medicine, public health, health care administration, pharmacy, nursing, and dentistry. ASLME’s Annual Health Law Professors Conference combines presentations by experienced health law teachers with the opportunity for discussion among conference participants. The program is designed to provide participants with updates on issues at the forefront of law and medicine and to provide them with the opportunity to share strategies, ideas, and materials. (Fee includes materials, breakfasts, lunches & receptions)


What Does It Look Like to Prescribe and to Take Psychiatric Medications Wisely? @ Duke Divinity School
Jun 7 – Jun 9 all-day

Drawing on the results of the first conference, the second conference will move beyond a specifically Christian context to the broader world of healthcare. In this conference, we seek to produce practical resources for both prescribers and consumers of psychiatric medication regarding how these medications might be used wisely, in a way that is attentive to the best medical research, to moral/ethical questions, and to social, political, and historical context. This conference will include thoughtful and well-respected psychiatric leaders, scholars who share concerns about the limits of medical narratives within psychiatry and who seek to place psychiatric medications within a larger social, political, and historical context, and persons who identify as consumers of psychiatric medication.

CBHD’s 25th Annual Summer Conference: Bioethics and Being Human @ Trinity International University
Jun 21 – Jun 23 all-day

The Center for Bioethics & Human Dignity’s 25th Annual Conference: Bioethics & Being Human

Join us for our 25th annual summer conference, as we explore anew our individual and common humanity in light of the ever-evolving developments in medicine, science, and technology. Plenary speakers will address being and remaining human in an age of science and technology, genetics, neuroscience & the BRAIN Initiative; bioethics in literature and pop culture; human rights & dignity; and theological examinations of contentment, human flourishing, particularity, and embodiment as they relate to bioethics.

Engage more personally in workshops and parallel sessions on a wide spectrum of perennial and emerging issues in contemporary bioethics relevant to professional practice, public policy, scholarship, the classroom, and making moral decisions in everyday life.

Plenary speakers include Christina Bieber Lake, PhD; Dennis Hollinger, PhD; C. Christopher Hook, MD; Warren Kinghorn, MD, ThD; Paul Scherz, PhD, PhD; Read Mercer Schuchardt, PhD; Michael Sleasman, PhD; Pia de Solenni, SThD; Morse Tan, JD; and Stephen Williams, PhD.

Conference workshops are sponsored by leading organizations such as Alliance Defending Freedom, American Association of Prolife OB|GYNS, Americans United for Life, Charlotte Lozier Institute, and Joni & Friends. These workshops include sessions on rights of conscience, disability, pain management & addiction, among others.

Conference rates are reduced in honor of CBHD’s 25th anniversary. Continuing Medical Education credit is pending and expected to be available.

The Center for Bioethics & Human Dignity is a Christian bioethics research center at Trinity International University committed to anticipating, interpreting, and engaging the pressing bioethical issues of our day from a Judeo-Christian Hippocratic perspective.

Arete Medical Ethics Summer Seminar @ Duke University, Durham, NC
Jun 25 – Jun 29 all-day

Arete Medical Ethics Summer Seminar
June 25-June 29, 2018 | Duke University, Durham, NC
A seminar for students of medicine and nursing

This seminar invites students to examine the central ethical questions that arise in the everyday practice of medicine and to interpret those questions through a moral framework drawing from both natural law and medicine’s traditional orientation toward the patient’s health. This framework will be contrasted with principlism and consequentialism as participants consider what sort of practice medicine is, whether it has a rational end or goal, and how medicine contributes to human flourishing.

The seminar will consider common clinical ethical cases to examine perennial ethical concerns that arise in the practice of medicine, including: the nature of the clinician-patient relationship; the limits of medicine, the meaning of autonomy, the place of conscience in the physician’s work, the difference between an intended effect and a side effect, proportionality, human dignity, sexuality and reproduction, the beginning of life, disability, end-of-life care, and death. The purpose of the seminar is to equip participants with intellectual tools that can help physicians discern how to practice medicine well in the face of medicine’s clinical challenges and moral complexities.

Farr Curlin, MD, Duke University
Christopher Tollefsen, PhD, University of South Carolina

This seminar is open to entering and current medical students, as well as nursing students

 Registration Fee and Facilities
A $200 non-refundable registration fee will be required of all accepted students. All other expenses, including room and board for the duration of the seminar, are covered by the Arete Initiative.

 Application Requirements and Instructions:
All applicants must submit the following forms and documents via e-mail to [email protected].

-Curriculum vitae or resume, including your nationality.
-Cover letter discussing the reasons for your interest in the seminar, an overview of any relevant experience in the seminar’s topic. Please explain how you found out about the seminar.

 Applications will be considered on a rolling basis until April 26th, 2018.


32nd European Conference on Philosophy of Medicine and Health Care: The Human Condition in between Medicine, Arts and the Humanities @ University of Lisbon (Portugal)
Aug 22 – Aug 25 all-day

This conference will be organised by the European Society for Philosophy of Medicine and Healthcare and the Faculty of Medicine, University of Lisbon. The relationships between medicine, arts and the humanities are multifaceted owing to the intricate ways in which they reflect and are conditioned by basic traits of the human condition. Art, humanities and medicine have pivotal roles in shaping our cultural and individual self-understanding. Medicine, whilst being regarded as a dominantly scientific endeavour, is also referred to as the art of healing. At least some medical illustrations and 3D models can arguably be seen as art. In addition, cosmetic dentistry and surgery are informed by aesthetic criteria. Vice versa, art can be seen as a form of therapy. The humanities, finally, play an increasingly important role in both medical education and clinical practice. In a time of kaleidoscopic change in medical research, clinical practice and healthcare systems, the focus of this conference is on medicine and its relations with the arts and the humanities. Abstracts addressing any of the issues mentioned in the headings below from a philosophical and/or ethical perspective will be favoured, although work on other topics can also be submitted.


Human Condition

  • Birth
  • Childhood & adolescence
  • Love, sex & reproduction
  • Illness/disease
  • Aging
  • Mortality and death


Arts and medicine

  • Literature and medicine
  • Music, dance, theatre, visual arts and literature and their role in supporting health and wellbeing
  • Popular culture



  • Narrative medicine
  • Life cycle and human condition: Between biology and biography
  • Health narratives and the fabrication of truth
  • Shaping identity and reconfiguration of medicine
  • Art, science-fiction, scientific imagination


Humanities and medicine

  • Medical and health humanities
  • History
  • Film and theatre studies
  • Religious/theological studies
  • Medical anthropology


Hope between uncertainty and complexity

  • Progress and sustainability
  • Artificial intelligence in medicine /health care
  • Robotics (care, social and/or sex robots)
  • Cybersex, cyborgs, cryonics and solitude
  • Transhumanism and science fiction



  • Intellectual property and conflict management
  • Creativity, censorship, viability and sponsorship
  • Decoding, artification of medical objects
  • Access to, dispersion and disposal of medical collections
  • Indigenous peoples and vulnerable populations


Innovations in Clinical Ethics: A Working Un-Conference @ Cleveland, Ohio
Aug 26 – Aug 28 all-day

Cleveland Clinic’s Center for Bioethics is proud to host Innovations in Clinical Ethics: A Working Un-Conference. The event will bring together experienced clinical ethicists from diverse healthcare systems for a purposeful and productive two days of promoting the cross-pollination and idea generation of innovative practices in clinical ethics consultation. There will be no plenary didactics or traditional presentation formats.

The event’s emphases will be on:

  • in-person peer-to-peer solution-sharing and problem-solving through structured and facilitated crowdsourcing
  • targeted lightning talks on cutting-edge practices in clinical ethics consultation
  • collaborative workshopping, constructive conversation and relationship-building, and other opportunities for concrete idea development
  • capturing collective knowledge generated through the use of scribes and digital tools for the benefit of attendees’ clinical ethics programs
  • culmination in an enduring work product, such as a series of whitepapers or publications

Please plan to join us in Cleveland from the evening of August 26 through the afternoon of August 28, 2018. Professional clinical ethicists who lead clinical ethics programs or serve on ethics consultation services will benefit most from this un-conference.

A pre-conference workshop through Cleveland Clinic’s Center for Excellence in Healthcare Communication is being planned during the day on August 26, 2018. More information regarding how attendees will shape the agenda of this un-conference, registration fees, and other event details to come.


Practice & Presence: A Gathering for Christians in Healthcare @ Duke Divinity School
Sep 7 – Sep 9 all-day

At its core, medicine is a practice of attending to those who suffer. Christians know that “those who suffer” are the neighbors we are called to love, even those in whom Jesus visits us (Mt. 25: 34-46). Who is equal to such a task? What does it look like when done well? What practices strengthen us for this sacred work? Join us in September as we wrestle with these questions, seeking to receive from God gifts that will renew us in our vocations as health care practitioners.

Over 3 days and 2 nights, on the campus of Duke University, nurses, physicians, therapists, students, chaplains, other health practitioners, and spouses will gather:

  • To tune our eyes and hearts to see how God is present in our work in health care
  • To engage scripture, theology, and Christian history—open to how our imaginations and our practices might be transformed
  • To grow in friendship with one another in the context of shared meals, conversation, prayer and worship
  • To rest, reflect, and respond to God’s love for us and for our world.


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